How Do You Track Down Your Turkey?

How Do You Track Down Your Turkey?

Thanksgiving is a holiday that centers mostly around grub, with all eyes on the tasty turkey towering over the fixings. But, if that turkey turns your tummy into a mess of bloating and nausea, and makes your body feel fatigued, you won’t be particularly thankful. A little secret that many of you mamas may not […]

Thanksgiving is a holiday that centers mostly around grub, with all eyes on the tasty turkey towering over the fixings. But, if that turkey turns your tummy into a mess of bloating and nausea, and makes your body feel fatigued, you won’t be particularly thankful.

A little secret that many of you mamas may not know is that when it comes to holiday turkey, it’s best to flock to the natural ones. Be aware that most commercially processed turkeys are fed animal byproducts, injected with hormones and then not allowed to roam free on the farm. Tell me you’re not going to feel like a turkey yourself serving that to your family.

Instead, turn your attention to a farm-raised bird – one that takes his time developing at a natural rate, and you’ll get tastier, more flavorful, healthier meat. Just think of that turkey-cranberry-sauce-stuffing sandwich you’ll make the next day. And the next. Leftovers last for the entire week in some families, and you don’t want anyone feeling yucky because of the poor bullied bird you chose.

Resolve to find your turkey from a trusted source this season. I love Mary’s Turkey http://www.marysturkeys.com/turkeydifference.html because the website finds a store near you that carries this healthy variety. Plus, you can watch a video of the sustainable farm and learn how the owners meet the turkey’s needs when they are small, which then eliminates antibiotics and additives as they get older. You can also ensure the best bird for your buck by checking out the turkey buying guide at nrdc.org http://www.nrdc.org/living/shoppingwise/organic-heritage-sustainable-when-talking-turkey-does-it-matter.asp.

And if you want to visit a local farm that sells turkey (search "turkey" on LocalHarvest.org), go armed with a few questions: What are the turkeys fed? Do they ever eat any animal byproducts? What size yard do you have for the turkeys and are they free to roam? The answers will tell you the quality of the bird. If what you hear doesn’t fly, then take your turkey touring elsewhere.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Got any questions or tips for families looking for a high quality bird for the holiday feast? Please share in the comments!

0 0
Feed

Leave a comment